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Hurricane Katrina damage. In Port Sulphur, La., residential damage was extensive. Schools buses were tossed around like toys. *THIS IMAGE MAY NOT BE USED FOR COMMERCIAL PURPOSES SUCH AS ADVERTISING, OR IN SUCH A WAY AS TO IMPLY ENDORSEMENT OF ANY PRODUCT NOAA/Science Source via Getty Images

Hurricane Katrina damage. In Port Sulphur, La., residential damage was extensive. Schools buses were tossed around like toys. *THIS IMAGE MAY NOT BE USED FOR COMMERCIAL PURPOSES SUCH AS ADVERTISING, OR IN SUCH A WAY AS TO IMPLY ENDORSEMENT OF ANY PRODUCT
NOAA/Science Source via Getty Images

(by Bill Quigley, Law Professor, Loyola University New Orleans, CCR Associate Legal Director for The Huffington Post) – When Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast on August 29, 2005, the nation saw tens of thousands of people left behind in New Orleans. Ten years later, it looks like the same people in New Orleans have been left behind again. The population of New Orleans is noticeably smaller and noticeably whiter. While tens of billions poured into Louisiana, the impact on poor and working people in New Orleans has been minimal. Many of the elderly and the poor, especially poor families with children, never made it back to New Orleans. The poverty rate for children who did made it back remains at disturbingly high pre-Katrina levels, especially for Black children. Rents are high and taking a higher percentage of people’s income. The pre-Katrina school system fired all it teachers and professionals and turned itself into the charter experiment capital of the US even while the number of children in public schools has dropped dramatically. Since Katrina, white incomes, which were over twice that of Blacks, have risen three times as much as Blacks. While not all the numbers below are bad, they do illustrate who has been left behind in the ten years since Katrina hit.

33; Rent in New Orleans is up 33 percent for one bedroom apartments and 41 percent for two bedroom apartments since Katrina hit. This is very tough because in New Orleans, 55 percent of residents rent. The national average is 35 percent. In 2005, one bedroom was $578 and two was $676. In 2015, it is $767 for one and $950 for two.
Before Katrina the average renter spent 19 percent of its income on rent. The Data Center, a terrific resource for information on the region, reports 37 percent of renters in New Orleans now spend more than 50 percent of their income to rent. Rental apartments are mostly substandard as well with 78 percent, nearly 50,000 apartments, in the city needing major repairs. And CNN/Money has named New Orleans as one of the worst cities in the US for renters.

38; In 2005, 38 percent of the children in New Orleans lived in poverty, 17 percentage points higher than the US as a whole. The most recent numbers show 39 percent of the children in New Orleans live in poverty, still 17 percentage points higher than the national average. 82 percent of these families have someone working in the family so the primary cause is low wages.

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